référence : http://listes.cru.fr/arc/mascarene/1997-04/msg00029.html
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Conquest/Conquista of/de Mexico BOURASSA ANDRE G



Bonjour!
Je vous transmets la reponse (en anglais) de Vern Williamsen a ma question
sur la parente eventuelle entre les pieces de Dryden et de Zarate sur la
conquete du Mexique. En gros - pour celles et ceux qui ne liraient pas
l'anglais -, le professeur Williamsen rappelle que les pieces de Zarate
ont circule avant d'etre publiees et que la version espagnole est
probablement anterieure a la version anglaise. Quelques exemples de ces
parentes et emprunts sont donnes.
Amities, Andre G. Bourassa. 

---------- Forwarded message ----------
[...} Zarate (Enriquez Gomez) wrote his play much earlier than its
publication date of 1668. Interestingly enough he lived in Rouen as a Jew
(even writing a treatise against the Inquisition from that place) but
continued to live off and on as a Christian in Spain. As you know the 
Spanish Golden Age drama was well known and traveled and the themes that
were dealt with in the COMEDIA re-appeared in all other countries (as did
the Italian themes that appeared so often in Spain). There has been some
interesting work done on the traveling theatrical companies the carried
these themes from one place to another. A student of mine once did a
dissertation on Hans Sachs and Lope de Rueda, exact contemporaries from 
two very disparate parts of the world who wrote very similar pieces
(structurally and thematically) in the 16th century. Then just take a
look at the theater of Rotrou in France and his use of Spanish thematic
material (material much better dealt with by Corneille and Moliere, of
course). The English theater was also full of pieces that were
translations (more of less faithful) and adaptations of COMEDIA. Look
also to the use by the principal dramatists like Lope de Vega and
Shakespeare of identical materials. There were two fine volumes published
by Louise Fothergill-Payne (UCalgary) on this parallelism (1980's?). The
subject never ends!

Vern Williamsen (vwilliam@ccit.arizona.edu)